Humans

(Karolinska Institutet) Oxygen therapy does not prevent the development of heart failure. Neither does it reduce the long-term risk of dying for patients with suspected heart attack. This has been proven for the first time by researchers at Karolinska Institutet as a result of a major Swedish study. The study is to be presented at the European Society of Cardiology's (ESC) cardiology congress in Munich and published at the same time in the journal Circulation.
August 26, 2018
(The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy & Clinical Practice) An estimated 53 percent of adults with serious mental illness (SMI) smoke, whereas, only 18 percent of adults in the general population smoke. While studies have shown that most smokers with SMI want to quit, they are less likely to do so. To better understand why quit rates were so low among this group, researchers from Dartmouth College and Harvard Medical School explored how social networks influenced smoking outcomes among people with SMI.
August 23, 2018
(Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center) Scientists may be on the road to solving the mystery of a group of mostly incurable blood diseases called myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), which cause people to have immature, malfunctioning bone marrow cells that fuel a diverse set of health problems and can lead to leukemia. Researchers report in the journal Cancer Discovery identifying a gene that in laboratory experiments fuels the biological processes that cause the different types of MDS that physicians see in patients.
August 23, 2018
(Chalmers University of Technology) With Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, as a hub, the world's first global research network into climate change denial has now been established. Building on a brand-new research publication showing the links between conservatism, xenophobia and climate change denial, the network will study how the growth of right-wing nationalism in Europe has contributed to an increase in climate change denial.
August 22, 2018
(Iowa State University) Gender stereotypes and biases still influence voters, especially in elections with more than one woman on the ballot. New research from Iowa State University found gender had the greatest effect on down-ballot races, in which women were running for a legislative office and another woman appeared on the ballot for a higher office, such as governor or president.
August 20, 2018
(University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston) Four years after their publication by the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC), voluntary guidelines designed to increase the safety of e-health records have yet to be implemented fully, according to a survey led by a researcher at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). Findings appeared recently in the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association.
August 16, 2018