Humans

(Cognitive Neuroscience Society) In new work being presented this week about the effects of exercise on the brain at the Cognitive Neuroscience Society (CNS) in San Francisco, researchers are finding that brain changes that occur after a single workout are predictive of what happens with sustained physical training over time.
March 24, 2019
(The Endocrine Society) Simplifying medication regimens and tailoring glycemic targets in older adults with diabetes improves adherence and avoids treatment-related complications, according to a Clinical Practice Guideline issued today by the Endocrine Society. The Society debuted the guideline during a press conference on the opening day of ENDO 2019, its annual meeting in New Orleans, La.
March 23, 2019
(Rutgers University) Imagine smart materials that can morph from being stiff as wood to as soft as a sponge - and also change shape. Rutgers University-New Brunswick engineers have created flexible, lightweight materials with 4D printing that could lead to better shock absorption, morphing airplane or drone wings, soft robotics and tiny implantable biomedical devices. Their research is published in the journal Materials Horizons.
March 22, 2019
(Northwestern University) Patients in a new Northwestern Medicine study were able to comprehend words that were written but not said aloud. They could write the names of things they saw but not verbalize them. For instance, if a patient in the study saw the word 'hippopotamus' written on a piece of paper, they could identify a hippopotamus in flashcards. But when that patient heard someone say 'hippopotamus,' they could not point to the picture of the animal.
March 21, 2019
(University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture) Heather Sedges Wallace, an assistant professor, human development specialist and certified family life educator in the Department of Family and Consumer Sciences, has received one of two national 2018 Early Career Achievement awards from the Institute of Youth, Family and Community - a division of the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA).
March 20, 2019
You've probably heard the word "metabolism," especially as it relates to weight loss or gain. But what is your metabolism, what does it do, and do you have any control over it?-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
March 20, 2019
(The North American Menopause Society (NAMS)) Healthy cognitive aging is a public health priority, especially as the US population grows older. Until now, not much has been known about the link between pregnancy history and cognitive function in older women. A new study finds that there does not appear to be a link. Study results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS).
March 20, 2019